Artists’ Trailers Are Moved Again, This Time Unceremoniously

A trailer park founded in 2009 by idealistic artists on the Williamsburg-Bushwick border in Brooklyn finds itself on the move again.

In February 2010, the trailer park was forced out of a warehouse zoned for commercial use at 304 Meserole Street by the New York Fire Department. With the consent of the warehouse’s owner, however, the trailer park was allowed to relocate to the overgrown lot behind the building, where it remained for over a year.

But the warehouse’s owner, it turns out, does not control the lot. And now the 25 residents of the trailer park say they were evicted — illegally this time — from the 4,400-square-foot lot by the cement company that leases the land.

On March 13, the company, Kings Building Supply, towed the 23 trailers around the corner to Johnson Avenue using forklifts and front-end loaders and left them in the street. Members of the New York City Police Department were present at the scene, the founders of the trailer park say.

Residents said that they were given no notice of an eviction and that 10 of the trailers were damaged beyond repair during the removal process.

Hayden Cummings, 28, one of the collective’s founders, said that employees of Kings Building Supply had given them permission to use the site. “They let us move our campers through their property,” he said, adding that the company had sold them gravel and helped them spread it on the unpaved lot.

“We were friendly with them,” he said. “They knew we were living there.”

But Michael Solomon, the chief financial officer of Kings Building Supply, said he did not learn of the trailer park’s existence until recently. He contends that the group was trespassing.

“The police showed up over a period of 10 days in March, and no one on the property was able to provide proof that they had a legal right to be there,” Mr. Solomon said.

He rejected the claim that the trailers were damaged during the eviction. “They were already falling apart,” he said. “We actually saved those guys a lot of money by moving the trailers ourselves.”

The collective, formally known as the Bushwick Project for the Arts, is filing a civil lawsuit against Kings Building Supply and Mr. Solomon, accusing them of ignoring a cease-and-desist letter and refusing to follow formal eviction proceedings.

The trailer park was first conceived in the summer of 2009, when Mr. Cummings began rounding up old travel campers and recreational vehicles he had found through Craigslist. He recruited artists interested in creating a collaborative live-work space, and that fall they signed a lease for the 6,500-square-foot warehouse in a former nut-roasting factory at 304 Meserole Street.

In the warehouse, the members, who ranged in age from 21 to 40, built a number of communal spaces, including a kitchen, wood shop, art gallery, recording studio and an aquaponic vegetable garden housed in a silver Airstream trailer.

Mr. Cummings equipped the trailers with wireless Internet, smoke detectors and running water, and he collected $500 to $650 in rent per month from each resident for full access to the facilities, which included four indoor toilets and hot showers.

When the trailers were moved outside in February 2010, members installed solar panels on their roofs. Events like figure drawing classes and free movie screenings took place regularly. Three chickens and a stray dog named Shambles roamed the lot.

“Time and again people told me, ‘This is the greatest place I’ve ever lived,’ ” Mr. Cummings said. “Everybody was finding each other jobs, or spotting people if they were short on rent. It was really working.”

The current dispute began when surveyors for New York & Atlantic Railway, a private company that provides freight services for the Long Island Rail Road, came to Kings Building Supply in January.

Kings Building Supply occupies what was formerly Long Island Rail Road’s Bushwick Branch terminal, property it leases from New York & Atlantic. Near the back of the property, surveyors noticed 23 trailers sandwiched between a building and a 14-foot-high wall of stacked bricks unloaded from railroad cars.

“We thought, ‘What are all these trailers doing on L.I.R.R. property?’ ” said Paul Victor, the president of New York & Atlantic. “We went back to Kings Materials and said this is not consistent with the terms of our lease, and that these people have to go.”

In a statement, Deputy Commissioner Paul J. Browne, the Police Department’s chief spokesman, said that Mr. Solomon “was warned by the Buildings Department that he faced fines if he didn’t get the trespassers off the property, and that his lease with the L.I.R.R. would not be renewed if he failed to act.”

On March 3, Mr. Browne said, police accompanied Mr. Solomon to the property and issued eight summonses for trespassing, and returned on March 5 to issue nine more. Four of the 17 people who were summonsed were arrested for outstanding warrants.

“On both days, the N.Y.P.D. offered free shelter and transportation to shelters for the trespassers,” Mr. Browne said. “All declined and left the area voluntarily.”

Yet several inhabitants remained at the site, partly to prevent their belongings from being stolen, Mr. Cummings said.

At 7 a.m. March 13, a Sunday, executives from Kings Building Supply and several police officers arrived to remove the trailers from the property.

According to Joe Diamond, a founder of the collective, Mr. Solomon and members of the police disregarded documentation that the campers had resided on the property for more than 30 days, entitling them to a formal notice of eviction.

“When I handed Mr. Solomon a cease-and-desist letter from our lawyer, he ripped it in half and said, ‘Give that to your lawyer,’ ” Mr. Diamond said. He said the episode was captured on video.

The police did not respond to requests for comment about the eviction itself. But Martin Needelman, chief counsel of Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation A, who has consulted the residents, said that the eviction might have constituted an “illegal lockout.”

“If the residents were there for 30 days with the knowledge of the property owners, then they are required to go to court before an eviction takes place,” Mr. Needelman said.

Last Friday, Mr. Cummings and Mr. Diamond were busy moving the unregistered trailers off the street — to several locations in Brooklyn — to prevent them from being impounded. They said they hoped they could persuade Kings Building Supply and New York & Atlantic to do something positive with their unused land.

“All we want to do,” Mr. Cummings said, “is to assume liability and pay rent for that small strip of land, so we can have our community back.”

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Triangle Fire: New Leaders Emerge

Most of the victims were unglorified, but the Triangle fire a century ago propelled other individuals to greater prominence. Among them were Frances Perkins, Alfred E. Smith, Robert F. Wagner, Rose Schneiderman, Anne Morgan and Max D. Steuer.

Frances Perkins, a 30-year-old Boston-born social worker, was visiting a friend on the opposite side of the park that Saturday, March 25, 1911, when they heard sirens and screams and rushed to the scene.

“We could see this building from Washington Square and the people had just begun to jump when we got there,” she recalled years later. “They had been holding until that time, standing in the windowsills, being crowded by others behind them, the fire pressing closer and closer, the smoke closer and closer.”

Miss Perkins, the executive secretary of the National Consumers League and a lobbyist for the fire-inspired Committee on Safety, galvanized New York’s officials. “The Triangle fire was a torch that lighted up the whole industrial scene,” she said.

With two Democratic clubhouse politicians from Manhattan, Assemblyman Alfred E. Smith and Senator Robert F. Wagner, the majority leader, she worked on a legislative Factory Investigation Commission (Mr. Wagner was chairman; Mr. Smith, vice chairman).

During its four years the commission would expand its mandate to include child labor, minimum wages and sanitary conditions (Miss Perkins herself drafted the report on fire hazards) and to recommend reforms, including creation of an Industrial Commission.

100 Years Later
The 1911 Triangle Fire

Fighting Triangle fire

Remembering the fire that killed 146 workers at a garment factory in Manhattan and its lasting impact.

In 1918, Governor Smith named Miss Perkins to the commission. But when his successor, Franklin D. Roosevelt, tapped her as industrial commissioner, Mr. Smith cautioned, “Men will take advice from a woman, but it is hard for them to take orders from a woman.”

Roosevelt appointed her nonetheless. Later, as president, he enlisted her as secretary of labor, the first woman in the cabinet. She would describe the Triangle fire as “the day the New Deal began.”

Alfred E. Smith represented the Lower East Side, where many Triangle victims lived. He liked to boast that he had earned an F.F.M. degree — from the Fulton Fish Market.

Mr. Smith was a Tammany Hall stalwart and, to give credit where it is due, elevating worker safety to the state agenda would have required the approval of the local Democratic leader, Timothy D. Sullivan, known as Big Tim, and Charles F. Murphy, the visionary boss of Tammany Hall, who valued the lives of their constituents as well as their votes.

Mr. Smith went on to become Assembly speaker, city sheriff and president of the Board of Aldermen. He was elected governor in 1918 and was re-elected to three two-year terms. He was the unsuccessful Democratic nominee for president in 1928.

Robert F. Wagner emigrated from Prussia with his parents when he was 8 years old. The son of a Yorkville janitor, he was elected to the Assembly in 1904 and later to the State Senate. He was Mr. Murphy’s hand-picked chairman of the factory commission.

After serving as a State Supreme Court justice, he was elected to the United States Senate in 1926.

Mr. Wagner was instrumental in advancing President Roosevelt’s progressive New Deal agenda, and was author of the Wagner Act, which established the National Labor Relations Board. He served four terms and was the first of three generations of New York statesmen, including Robert F. Wagner Jr., who was mayor from 1954 through 1965.

Rose Schneiderman, the eldest daughter of a tailor, was the conscience of the labor movement. Born in Russian Poland in 1884, she immigrated to New York six years later. Her passion for workers’ rights was ignited when, newly hired, she discovered that after 14 years fellow employees in a department store were making the same $2.75 a week that she earned. She became a cap maker and, when she was 20, joined the National Women’s Trade Union League, a group that crossed class lines to lobby for better working conditions and embraced a socialist agenda.

Miss Schneiderman was instrumental in helping to organize garment workers for a strike in 1909, but it was at a memorial service for the Triangle fire victims, on April 2, 1911, at the Metropolitan Opera House, that her message riveted the public, including Frances Perkins.

“I would be a traitor to those poor burned bodies if I came here to talk good fellowship,” she declared. “Too much blood has been spilled. I know from my experience it is up to the working people to save themselves. The only way they can save themselves is by a strong working-class movement.”

She later served in Roosevelt’s brain trust, and as secretary of the New York State Department of Labor under Gov. Herbert H. Lehman. She was an ardent feminist and champion of women’s suffrage and was a founding member of the American Civil Liberties Union.

“What the woman who labors wants is the right to live, not simply exist,” Miss Schneiderman said in an influential speech. “The worker must have bread, but she must have roses, too. Help, you women of privilege, give her the ballot to fight with.”

Anne Morgan, who was born in 1873, was the youngest daughter of the financier J. Pierpont Morgan. She was one of the world’s richest women at the time and a philanthropist. Publicity-shy, she nevertheless led worker reform and women’s rights efforts as a member of Miss Schneiderman’s “mink brigade.”

She was instrumental in recruiting other socialites — Harrimans, Stokes, Whitneys, Kahns, Pulitzers, Delafields, Dodges, Belmonts — to the cause of working women. In 1909. she invited 150 friends to the Colony Club on Madison Avenue, which she helped found, to hear firsthand from garment workers.

She later sponsored the Opera House memorial and served on Miss Perkins’s Committee on Safety as a city sanitary inspector to personally observe social conditions. But she, like many of the socialites, became less enthusiastic about the labor movement as more of the post-Triangle talk turned to socialism.

Max D. Steuer, who defended the Triangle owners against negligence charges, was the premier defense lawyer of his day. Born in Austria in 1871, he came to America by way of Australia, worked as a newsboy and in a tailor shop, and graduated with honors from Columbia Law School.

Mr. Steuer, another Tammany loyalist, was famous for relentlessly challenging hostile witnesses, peppering one with questions in French and algebraic. In the Triangle case, he gingerly asked a young garment worker to repeat her word-for-word eyewitness testimony, suggesting that it might have been rehearsed and memorized. On the fourth account, he interrupted her:

“Katie, have you not forgotten a word?”

“Yes, sir,” she replied smiling. “I left out one word.”

“Well, tell the story again and put the word in,” Steuer asked.

She did. The two defendants were acquitted.

He was considered so valuable that in 1937, a court awarded him a $75,000 fee for representing two clients who won a $45,000 judgment. The court said his fee was reasonable.

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Returning Chestnut Trees to City Where Blight Was First Found

“All Chestnut Trees Here Are Doomed” read the headline in The New York Times.

The year was 1911, “here” was greater New York, and the great chestnut blight, which was first discovered in the Bronx Zoo in 1904, was well on its way to wiping out four billion of the trees that once made up a quarter of the Northeast’s hardwoods.

Now, blight-resistant American chestnuts, 22 years and six generations in the breeding, are coming to New York City.

In fact, they are already here — 10 nuts, smaller than the chestnut-cart variety, trailing green sprouts and packed in peat moss, sitting in a Ziploc bag in a box on the middle shelf of Bart Chezar’s refrigerator on Garfield Place in Park Slope, Brooklyn, atop a defrosting top-round steak.

At a ceremony on Thursday in Prospect Park, where more than 1,400 chestnuts were felled by blight in the first decade of the 20th century alone, officials of the American Chestnut Foundation will present the seeds to the city parks department.

It is just a photo op. The nuts will immediately be whisked off to the department’s Native Plant Center on Staten Island, where they will be tended like the tender babies that they are until this fall or next spring, then planted in Prospect Park and in the Native Flora Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden nearby.

The hope, of course, is to help undo one of the city’s, and the nation’s, saddest pieces of botanical history.

“It’s kind of a circle there,” said Mr. Chezar, a retired New York Power Authority engineer, stalwart park volunteer and long-time member of the chestnut foundation. “What’s going on tomorrow, and the early history of the trees and the blight.”

In the late 19th century, chestnut trees, with their furrowed bark, long toothed leaves and spine-covered fruit, were as familiar and common as oaks. Their ramrod-straight trunks, which often rose for 50 feet before branching, made high-quality timber, and the savory nuts were a major food source for squirrel and human alike.

Then, through multiple ports and Asian trees, came the blight, a fungus that first showed as orange pinhead-size growths that split the bark and then girdled the tree, cutting off circulation and causing death by strangulation.

The spores required only the tiniest wound to gain entry — a snapped branch, a squirrel’s tooth, a nut-gatherer’s knife could do it. By the time the Bronx Zoo’s forester, H. W. Merkel, noticed dying trees in 1904, the pandemic was well under way. In 1906, a mycologist at the New York Botanical Garden nearby, William A. Murrill, identified and classified the fungus and became forever associated with it: Diaporthe parasitica Murrill.

“The wail of the chestnut tree lover is heard from all parts of New York, Long Island and adjacent country,” The Times wrote in 1908. “Hundreds of letters are received at the Botanical Garden, containing almost piteous appeals for help from people whose trees are dying.”

No cure could be found. By 1940, American chestnut trees had just about vanished, though sprouts still persist today, and still blight.

Efforts had already begun, though, to crossbreed American chestnuts with blight-resistant Chinese chestnuts. They were never considered hearty enough to warrant widespread planting, but in 1989, the chestnut foundation began a new project at its research farm in Meadowview, Va. It “backcrossed” the Chinese-American hybrids with American chestnuts to produce a tree that was more American with each generation but still resistant to blight.

Three years ago, the United States Forest Service began planting the foundation’s “Restoration Chestnuts,” which are 15/16ths American, in national forests in Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia. The foundation made them available to some of its members in small quantities, which is where Mr. Chezar enters the picture.

In 2004, Mr. Chezar took part in the planting of some purebred American chestnuts in Prospect Park, in anticipation of the eventual availability of the crossbreds. Eight have survived, the tallest of which now stands 35 feet high, in a glen near the Picnic House. One flowered and produced some small nuts last year. But without help, they are most likely doomed.

“They haven’t gotten the blight so far, but they probably will in the future,” Mr. Chezar, 64, said. It lives in the soil and will find them eventually.

He asked the chestnut foundation for some of its blight-resistant nuts, so that they might inoculate the purebreds. “My pitch was that we should have some of these blight-resistant trees in New York City, where people can see them and learn about them and find out why they’re important,” he said.

Within weeks, his box of nuts had arrived in the mail.

“We’re hoping these trees will grow 100 feet tall,” said Fred Hebard, the chief scientist for the foundation. “At this point, we’re still in the testing phase to see if that hope is realized. I guess we’ll find out 60 or 80 years from now.”

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DELDOT – growing in the wrong places?

Over the past five fiscal years the operating budget of the Delaware Department of Transportation (DELDOT) has grown 18% while inflation rose 7%. So, DELDOT has been living large, yet the winners and losers inside the Department are curious.

The big winner with a 45% budget increase over the five years is the Motor Vehicles administration. Curiously, for those of us who have visited the DMV during the past year, according to their mission statement the DMV embraces “high standards of courteous, efficient and timely service.”

Other winners include the Office of the Secretary (24% increase), Technology and Support (19%), and Public Relations (16%).

Oddly enough, given all DELDOT’s questionable decisions on capital projects as revealed recently by the News Journal, among the big losers in the budget battle are Planning (a 1% increase) and Transportation Solutions (a 34% decrease). One key objective of Planning is to acquire real estate needed for protecting and improving the state’s transportation system (e.g., a million dollars an acre for the closed Wright Chrysler dealership). And a key objective of Transportation Solutions is to ensure that DELDOT consistently delivers high-quality projects from concept through construction and ensure projects are completed on time as scheduled (e.g., the Indian River Bridge).

Although more information is needed before conclusions can be drawn, on the face of it one wonders if DELDOT should be spending less money on Public Relations and more money on the functions of Planning and Transportation Solutions.

Dr. John E. Stapleford, Director
Center for Economic Policy and Analysis
[email protected]

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Planting Chestnut Trees in City Where Blight Began

“All Chestnut Trees Here Are Doomed” read the headline in The New York Times.

The year was 1911, “here” was greater New York, and the great chestnut blight, which was first discovered in the Bronx Zoo in 1904, was well on its way to wiping out four billion of the trees that once made up a quarter of the Northeast’s hardwoods.

Now, blight-resistant American chestnuts, 22 years and six generations in the breeding, are coming to New York City.

In fact, they are already here — 10 nuts, smaller than the chestnut-cart variety, trailing green sprouts and packed in peat moss, sitting in a Ziploc bag in a box on the middle shelf of Bart Chezar’s refrigerator on Garfield Place in Park Slope, Brooklyn, atop a defrosting top-round steak.

At a ceremony on Thursday in Prospect Park, where more than 1,400 chestnuts were felled by blight in the first decade of the 20th century alone, officials of the American Chestnut Foundation will present the seeds to the city parks department.

It is just a photo op. The nuts will immediately be whisked off to the department’s Native Plant Center on Staten Island, where they will be tended like the tender babies that they are until this fall or next spring, then planted in Prospect Park and in the Native Flora Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden nearby.

The hope, of course, is to help undo one of the city’s, and the nation’s, saddest pieces of botanical history.

“It’s kind of a circle there,” said Mr. Chezar, a retired New York Power Authority engineer, stalwart park volunteer and long-time member of the chestnut foundation. “What’s going on tomorrow, and the early history of the trees and the blight.”

In the late 19th century, chestnut trees, with their furrowed bark, long toothed leaves and spine-covered fruit, were as familiar and common as oaks. Their ramrod-straight trunks, which often rose for 50 feet before branching, made high-quality timber, and the savory nuts were a major food source for squirrel and human alike.

Then, through multiple ports and Asian trees, came the blight, a fungus that first showed as orange pinhead-size growths that split the bark and then girdled the tree, cutting off circulation and causing death by strangulation.

The spores required only the tiniest wound to gain entry — a snapped branch, a squirrel’s tooth, a nut-gatherer’s knife could do it. By the time the Bronx Zoo’s forester, H. W. Merkel, noticed dying trees in 1904, the pandemic was well under way. In 1906, a mycologist at the New York Botanical Garden nearby, William A. Murrill, identified and classified the fungus and became forever associated with it: Diaporthe parasitica Murrill.

“The wail of the chestnut tree lover is heard from all parts of New York, Long Island and adjacent country,” The Times wrote in 1908. “Hundreds of letters are received at the Botanical Garden, containing almost piteous appeals for help from people whose trees are dying.”

No cure could be found. By 1940, American chestnut trees had just about vanished, though sprouts still persist today, and still blight.

Efforts had already begun, though, to crossbreed American chestnuts with blight-resistant Chinese chestnuts. They were never considered hearty enough to warrant widespread planting, but in 1989, the chestnut foundation began a new project at its research farm in Meadowview, Va. It “backcrossed” the Chinese-American hybrids with American chestnuts to produce a tree that was more American with each generation but still resistant to blight.

Three years ago, the United States Forest Service began planting the foundation’s “Restoration Chestnuts,” which are 15/16ths American, in national forests in Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia. The foundation made them available to some of its members in small quantities, which is where Mr. Chezar enters the picture.

In 2004, Mr. Chezar took part in the planting of some purebred American chestnuts in Prospect Park, in anticipation of the eventual availability of the crossbreds. Eight have survived, the tallest of which now stands 35 feet high, in a glen near the Picnic House. One flowered and produced some small nuts last year. But without help, they are most likely doomed.

“They haven’t gotten the blight so far, but they probably will in the future,” Mr. Chezar, 64, said. It lives in the soil and will find them eventually.

He asked the chestnut foundation for some of its blight-resistant nuts, so that they might inoculate the purebreds. “My pitch was that we should have some of these blight-resistant trees in New York City, where people can see them and learn about them and find out why they’re important,” he said.

Within weeks, his box of nuts had arrived in the mail.

“We’re hoping these trees will grow 100 feet tall,” said Fred Hebard, the chief scientist for the foundation. “At this point, we’re still in the testing phase to see if that hope is realized. I guess we’ll find out 60 or 80 years from now.”

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Elizabeth Taylor’s New York

In the theatrical trailer for “Butterfield 8,” the deep-voiced announcer declared: “She’s not like anyone. That’s for sure.”

He was talking about the character Gloria Wandrous, but the same seven words could describe the actress who played Gloria, Elizabeth Taylor, who died on Wednesday at 79. After all, both were larger-than-life types whose Manhattan was stylish, at least on the surface. But Gloria Wandrous’s New York was not Elizabeth Taylor’s New York.

Gloria had her many, mostly male, fans — as a guy at a bar in “Butterfield 8” wryly explained: “We meet once a year, in Yankee Stadium.” But she never married any of them, and Richard Burton and Larry Fortensky — to name two of Ms. Taylor’s husbands — never hung out together at Yankee Stadium.

Gloria Wandrous was never named as a defendant in a Manhattan court, as Ms. Taylor was in a $50 million lawsuit over “Cleopatra,” the movie she made after “Butterfield 8.”

Gloria Wandrous never played hostess at a $100-a-person birthday supper for Bella Abzug, the Manhattan congresswoman who was campaigning for the United States Senate, as Ms. Taylor did with Shirley MacLaine in 1976.

Gloria Wandrous never appeared in an “I Love New York” commercial, as Ms. Taylor did in 1982.

Gloria Wandrous never held a wedding reception for her adopted daughter, as Ms. Taylor did that same year. There was talk that she charged it to room service.

Gloria Wandrous never introduced a perfume called Passion, as Ms. Taylor did in 1987, or fended off rumors that she called the news conference about Passion to make a passionate announcement about an engagement to George Hamilton.

And Gloria Wandrous never starred on Broadway, as Ms. Taylor did in the 1980s. It was said when she opened in “The Little Foxes” that her dressing room had been done over at a cost of more than $20,000, nearly $50,000 in present-value dollars. The color was described as lavender.

“Butterfield 8” was filmed in a faux New York that was in New York — in two studios, one in Manhattan, the other in the Bronx. There were a few shots from Connecticut and Rockland County, but on those open-sided sets the carpenters built Gloria’s New York: an expensive-looking Fifth Avenue store, a dark Greenwich Village apartment, the 10-room Fifth Avenue place with a mirror big enough to write “No Sale” in lipstick.

In Ms. Taylor’s New York, she did the things New Yorkers do and shared the preoccupations New Yorkers share. Even in 1960, real estate was at the top of the list. When she was filming “Butterfield 8” and married to Eddie Fisher, she said: “We’re house-hunting New Yorkers. Our home is here now, not in Hollywood.”

Later on she had to deal with the obstacles New Yorkers face, like getting reservations for a sold-out performance.

She tried, in 1981, when she and Rock Hudson wanted to see the singer Barbara Cook at the Cafe Carlyle. Ms. Cook was to appear at 10 p.m. and at midnight. The Carlyle said it could not squeeze in anyone else — not even Ms. Taylor and Mr. Hudson.

Other New Yorkers would go on a different night and wonder if that woman off to the side who looked like Liza Minnelli really was Liza Minnelli. But doors opened for Ms. Taylor and Mr. Hudson: the Carlyle’s doors. It scheduled a third performance, at 1:15 a.m.

At times, she created obstacles for other New Yorkers — traffic tie-ups and mob scenes. When Mr. Burton was starring in “Hamlet” soon after they were married the first time, crowds filled West 46th Street every night. The Times quoted the astonished stage doorman at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater as saying, “Not even John Barrymore could draw crowds like this every night.”

She and Mr. Burton needed a dozen or so police officers to set up barricades and see them to their Cadillac limousine, a contrast to Gloria Wandrous, who died at the wheel of a sporty little roadster in a movie in which she had declared, “I had more fun in the back of a ’39 Ford than I could ever have in a vault at the Chase National Bank.”

Miss Taylor did not get around in a ’39 Ford. Most of the time she came and went by limousine. But once, after a performance of “The Little Foxes” in August 1981, her ride was a fire truck.

“There was kind of a big crowd” outside the Martin Beck Theater (now the Al Hirschfeld), she said, “and I was getting a bit squished. Because the production is coming to a close, the crowds have been getting bigger every night.”

The firefighters of Engine Company 54 spotted this jam during a routine restaurant inspection on West 45th Street. They came to the rescue after Senator John W. Warner of Virginia — her husband at the time — asked for help. (At least, that was their story.) Against Fire Department regulations, 54 Truck gave Miss Taylor, her dog, Senator Warner and their bodyguard a lift to the Pierre Hotel, where they were staying.

“It was a bit scary,” she said of the ride uptown. “I think my dog almost had cardiac arrest. It’s not your everyday way of traveling.”

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Returning to the Workforce

People leave the workplace under all kinds of circumstances, whether voluntary or not. Lay-offs, sicknesses, and motherhood are the most common reasons for taking time off from work. With the poor state of todays economy, unemployment rates are surfacing at an all time high. Because the workplace changes over the years, being out of work for a while can mean a need for updated wardrobes, resumes, interviewing skills, and knowledge of what employers are looking for. Many of these issues evolve over time and by keeping up with the trends, candidates will successfully convey their interest in getting the job.


The majority of people facing unemployment or getting back to work for the first time in months or even years are generally the population that were laid-off during the recession. Diana Middleton of The Wall Street Journal states how Starting any new job is hard, and coming back to work after a long layoff can be even harder. You have to re-establish a routine, refresh your skills and rebuild your confidence. Keeping up with the current trends is imperative in making a successful comeback.


Get back into the swing of things


Going back to work for the first time in months and in many cases, even years, can be an extremely intimidating and nerve-racking experience. This is especially true for the many people who got laid-off from their previous jobs and experienced months of unemployment. Returning to the workplace is, although an exciting time, very stressful for people who have gotten out of the working routine. As Michael Luo of The New York Times suggests, Interviews with more than a dozen people who were out of work at least a half-year during the recession and have now landed jobs found many adjusting to new realities. They include grappling with newfound insecurities and scaled-back budgets; reshaped priorities and broken relationships. In some ways, it is equivalent to the lingering symptoms of post-traumatic stress.


In general, interviewing is only half the battle when making a return to the workplace. Dealing with the implications of unemployment for months or years is one of the most difficult obstacles, especially mentally, when finally returning to work. Peoples anxieties are extremely high when they face this type of a comeback. By making a routine of exercising, eating, and sleeping, newly employed people can get back on their feet both physically and mentally, which will lead to a better workplace performance.


A successful transition


Being the new person in the office can be a stressful time. It is best to connect with people quickly in order to learn as much about the company as possible. This way, the transition from the unemployed world to the working one can be as rapid and worry-free as possible. This will reduce the stress and anxiety that may accompany starting a new job. Overall, the key to getting back to work and feeling comfortable with this transition comes from establishing a routine and rebuilding poise. With this confidence, new employees will flourish.


Reaction Search International is a leading executive search firm specializing in the placement of sales and marketing professionals throughout various industries within the United States and abroad.

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Have You Ever Seen An Arrowboard That You Were Grateful For

When you need to take control over the direction people or vehicles are moving, plastic barricades can be very useful. They are relatively lightweight, easily maneuvered to enable them to be changed and moved accordingly, and are cost-effective as they can be utilized time and time again for many different projects. Plastic barricades can supply safety and order when and where it can be needed.


Plastic barricades come in many shapes and sizes based upon the purpose for which these are needed. The majority of us have witnessed the large orange barrels that are used in construction zones. These are generally a type of plastic barricade. In addition there are the tall, tiered orange and white striped barriers that are often used for road closings. There are also interlocking plastic barricades which can be used to keep crowds on sidewalks or simply to keep unwanted guests out!


A variety of companies and agencies use plastic barricades every day. Law enforcement agencies rely on them as a method of crowd or traffic control. Of course, construction companies utilize them for the protection of their employees as well as the surrounding community alike. Really, anyone thinking about keeping people out or in, whichever the case might be may have a use for barricades.


Anytime safety is paramount, plastic barricades can come to save the day. Perhaps it will sound silly, but they can prevent chaos but providing direction to traffic as well as a crowd. Can you imagine driving down the highway and not having those barricades separating the lanes of traffic inside of a construction zone? Though those barricades are usually constructed from concrete to absorb the power and impact of a collision, plastic barricades serve the same purpose.


Where will you see these plastic barricades? You could see them not only in construction zones, but in addition when going to a concert, or at a major sporting event. Wherever safety is a concern and crowds are present, you can bet that there is plastic barricades around. Their orange color ensures they are plainly visible plus they can be adorned with a reflector or flashing light to ensure they are more visible in the evening.


Though a lot of people find plastic barricades relatively annoying (those orange construction barrels are often not a welcomed sight), they are an essential evil which help maintain law and order along with safety. A plastic barricade in the form of a saw horse can safeguard your automobile from a pothole in the road or prevent you from slipping on a wet floor. They will protect you from unseen dangers like sinkholes. Even though we may not love them they are utilized for our own protection which is a good thing!


As earlier mentioned plastic barrels are practical for the companies that use them. They are much lighter than their concrete counterparts so they can be adjusted and require significantly less manpower to move around. Being plastic, they stand up nicely during stormy weather and are more easily repaired or swapped out if they should become damaged.


So you see, plastic barricades allow us to maintain a civil, safe society. These are something to be appreciated, not annoyed with. Next time you come upon one of these barriers, be grateful that someone else is looking out for you!


If you were looking for traffic cones or plastic delineators you have come to the right source. As you continue to research about traffic cones or plastic delineators you will find the many options available to you. Please continue reading more articles about arrowboard or portable barriers.

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