Bicyclist Riding Against Traffic Dies After Being Hit by 2 Cars

A bicyclist traveling the wrong way in a lane on New Utrecht Avenue in Borough Park, Brooklyn, was killed early Friday morning after two cars struck him near the intersection at 58th Street, the police said.

The cyclist, Victor Lopez, was southbound on the east side of New Utrecht Avenue, a two-way street, when he collided with a northbound 2008 Honda, according to the police. Mr. Lopez was then hit by another car, also a 2008 Honda, going west on 58th Street.

He was declared dead at the scene of the accident, which happened shortly before 5:20 a.m.

The authorities are investigating whether either car stopped, the police said, but no criminality is suspected at this time.

Mr. Lopez lived on 34th Street in Brooklyn. He was 49.

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Wallets Disappear, Followed by Cash via A.T.M.’s

The not-at-all-disreputable-looking grand larcenist has struck again.

At 6:40 p.m. on Jan. 31, the police say, the woman in these surveillance photos withdrew money at an A.T.M. from the account of a woman who had recently noticed her wallet missing at the Key Food supermarket at 52 Avenue A in the East Village.

The same thief, the police said, had been seen on Nov. 19 withdrawing $2,000 at a Chase branch on Eighth Avenue and 15th Street in Manhattan from the account of a woman who had noticed her wallet missing in the Borough Hall subway station in Brooklyn.

The police did not say how much money had been withdrawn in the more recent incident or where it took place.

Anyone with information about the crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers.

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Old Subway Station Will Temporarily Replace New Station Damaged by Sandy

Workers pumping out water from subway tracks inside the South Ferry subway station, which was swamped by Hurricane Sandy. Transit officials said the old South Ferry station will be reopened while repairs are completed. Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times Workers pumping out water from subway tracks inside the South Ferry subway station, which was swamped by Hurricane Sandy. Transit officials said the old South Ferry station will be reopened while repairs are completed.

With South Ferry station still perhaps years away from returning to service due to Hurricane Sandy, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority will revive a decommissioned station at the same location as early as next month, officials said on Friday.

The old station had been put into retirement in 2009, replaced by a gleaming new station that cost over $500 million to construct. But the new station suffered perhaps the worst damage of any corner of the transit system during Hurricane Sandy, leading officials to predict that it could take as long as three years to rebuild it completely, at an estimated cost of $600 million.

Interactive Feature
Panorama: South Ferry’s Stations

DESCRIPTION

A panoramic display of the new South Ferry station when it opened in 2009, and the old station, which is being reopened.

The prospect of reopening the old station at first seemed remote, but in recent weeks, officials hinted that returning some service to the stop — the last on the No. 1 train and a critical connection for Staten Island Ferry riders — was essential. In the station’s absence, riders have been forced to either walk to the No. 1 at Rector Street, take the R train from Whitehall Street, or use the No. 4 or 5 train at Bowling Green.

Thomas F. Prendergast, the interim executive director of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, said last month that the inconvenience was “just too hard” for riders to bear for years to come.

But restoring the old hub is no easy task. The station’s loop track has been used since the storm as a turnaround point for No. 1 trains, but the station itself was long known for its peculiar layout. For one, the sharp curve of the platform allowed only passengers in the first five cars to disembark.

“It’s not a perfect solution,” said Allen P. Cappelli, a board member from Staten Island. “But it’s much appreciated.”

Officials have said that they are not aware of any decommissioned station ever returning to use as a passenger hub in the agency’s history.

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Waiting for Radiation Treatment, an Inspiration

Dear Diary:

At the desk, my friend Fran registers for radiation therapy and we take our seats in one of three chilly waiting rooms at Sloan-Kettering’s oncology department. The early-morning sun shines through grimy, rain-spattered windowpanes. Suddenly a diminutive figure breezes in; her black-and-white striped floppy hat all but obscures her face. A raincoat of the same design flows from her shoulders, forming outstretched wings.

She sinks into the last empty chair and in a peppy voice says, “We’d all rather be someplace else, done with all this stuff, but that’s life, isn’t it?”

I stare, mesmerized, as does everyone else in the room. The woman parks her red-wire, fold-up shopping cart — containing newspaper, Danielle Steel novel and lunchbox — beside her chair. When she checks in at the desk, the staffer chides her, “Mrs. G., your appointment with Dr. R. is for tomorrow at 2.”

“That’s O.K.,” she says. “I’m here now. I’d rather be a day early than be called ‘the late Mrs. G.’ You can call me Pigeon; that’s what my boyfriend calls me.”

A giggle goes around the room. She settles in her chair and forages for her lunch, saying: “I’m 86. I have diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart condition and now this. Nevertheless, my doctor told me I’d be fine — therefore I must not give up. It’s all about attitude, isn’t it?”

Pigeon knows that cancer is the common denominator in the room. She greets some of the patients, rejoicing with the college student in remission, inquiring of the mother from France about the progress of her 11-year-old son. Watching Fran go in for radiation, she says to me, “You are a true friend to come with her every day.”

En route by taxi back to Fran’s apartment on 58th Street, Fran doesn’t feel like talking, giving me time to ponder Pigeon’s philosophy of life: that it all boils down to the will to survive, despite all obstacles. Our driver threads his way across Central Park, pausing to make a turn near Strawberry Fields. I watch a groom feeding lunch to his chestnut mare. No sooner has he set the pail of oats on the sidewalk than a flock of pigeons swoops down, sharing the horse’s lunch.


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Pratt Students Talk About Fire’s Cost to Them

Two weeks after a fire at Pratt Institute ravaged the Brooklyn art school’s historic Main Building and destroyed thousands of student artworks, The Local blog checked in with a handful of students who came by a makeshift dispensary to pick up donated art supplies.

The Local’s piece, published Thursday, finds the artists variously philosophical, lost and inspired. One student reported he had started mixing soot into his paint. Another told The Local that after the fire: “I just started immediately working on new stuff. I kind of saw it as a good thing, because I was kind of stuck and now I’m moving in a new direction.

Read more on The Local.

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Missing Nutella, Part 2: Columbia Puts Consumption Far Below Report

Columbia University on Thursday issued what a spokesman called “a tongue-in-cheek university statement” about the cost of Nutella that students have been eating in — or stealing from — campus dining halls.

“Nutella-gate Exposed,” the statement said. “It’s a Smear!”

The statement said Nutella was not costing Columbia $5,000 a week, as many outlets, including this one, had reported. That figure had been cited by a member of the Columbia College Student Council, Peter Bailinson, who said he got it from the executive director of the university’s Dining Services, Vicki Dunn. He said the $5,000 figure covered only one week last month, the first week in which Nutella was available in dining halls every day. (Until then, it had mainly been served in crepes on weekends.)

Mr. Bailinson said Ms. Dunn had told him that students had run through 100 pounds of Nutella a day. The Columbia Spectator quoted her as saying that Dining Services was “going through product faster than anticipated” because students were filling cups with Nutella in one dining hall and taking “full jars” from another.

The Spectator speculated that Dining Services could spend $250,000 on Nutella in one year.

Columbia, which had declined to comment on the Nutella situation on Wednesday, said in its statement Thursday that “the ongoing weekly cost of Nutella supply is actually less than one-tenth the purported amount originally reported on a student blog and quickly picked up by other media.”

“It is true that in the first three-four days after Nutella was recently added to the dining hall selections,” the statement said, “demand was indeed extraordinarily high.”

But the statement, first published Thursday by The Spectator, said “the actual cost was only about $2,500, and quickly went down to $450 per week for dining halls that serve some 3,600 students, seven days a week at three locations.”

The statement also said that “media attention to Nutella-gate has cut down on the amount people have been taking in recent days.”

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