Is Your Constructing Business Covered In The Event Of Accidental Pollution?

Environment consciousness is at an all time high, and contractors are under increased scrutiny as a result. Pollution related laws are constantly changing, and the punishments for violating them continue to get more and more significant. If you own a contracting business, having Contractors Pollution Liability coverage is the best way to protect yourself from an unfortunate accident. There is watchful eye on contracting businesses; now is the time to protect your hard work.

What is Pollution Liability Coverage?

Comprehensive Contractors Pollution Liability Coverage (CPL) protects your contracting business in the event that you are involved in accidental pollution or damage to the environment. Your CPL policy covers common pollution related situations like the accidental release of gases, spilling of hazardous materials and toxins, and damage to utilities. Your insurance specialist can also help customize your policy to include protection against bodily injury, damage to property and environmentContractors Pollution Liability , emergency response costs, and more.

Is Pollution Liability Coverage Available For All Kinds of Contractors?

All types of contractors face the risk of accidental pollution. CPL coverage is available for all contractors, regardless of their specialty. Policies can be extended to include coverage for off-site transportation, owned/operated sites, public relations for crisis management, and much more. Contractors need to be prepared for the worst; accidental pollutionand environmental damage has the potential to cripple any contracting business. Contractors Pollution Liability coverage will save the day when you need it most.

The Ad Campaign: Quinn Pitches Herself as Champion for Middle Class


Native Speaker by Chang-rae LeeThe current mayoral race provides a fitting occasion to read “Native Speaker,” Chang-rae Lee’s 1995 novel of ethnicity and city politics. In it readers meet Henry Park, a son of Korean immigrants who uneasily assimilates into New York life. As a private intelligence operative, Park infiltrates the team of a popular Korean-American city councilman with bigger ambitions and a bitter grip on American culture.

The Big City Book Club will convene online to discuss the novel on Tuesday, Aug. 13 at 6:30 p.m.



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July 18: Where the Candidates Are Today

7:30 a.m.
Greets morning commuters at the 46th Street subway station, on Roosevelt Avenue in Queens.

12 p.m.
Starts on the second leg of his five-mile tour of Queens’ Roosevelt Avenue, talking with residents and small-business owners about development issues in Queens.

6 p.m.
Evoking a similar trek Mayor Bloomberg made eight years ago when he followed Orthodox Jews to their summertime retreats to ask for their votes and load up on seltzer and cinnamon pastry, Mr. Albanese departs with his wife, Lorraine, for the Catskills, where his campaign confidently predicts they “will meet New York City voters,” even though many campaign stops are 100 miles from the city’s northernmost tip.

8:45 p.m.
Greets customers, together with his wife, Lorraine, at Feller’s Four Corner Pizza Restaurant, the first of two pizza parlors where they will be noshing, er, campaigning, tonight, in Woodbridge, N.Y.

9:30 p.m.
Moves on to Fialkoff’s Kosher Pizza Restaurant, the second pizza parlor of the evening, with his wife, Lorraine, and introduces himself to the crowd there, in Monticello.

10 p.m.
Hardly finished with their rounds, he and his wife, Lorraine, buttonhole shoppers at the ShopRite in Thompson Square in their continuing search for registered New York City voters, in Monticello.

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New York Today: Be Cool

We’ll not mention that we’re in the midst of a seven-day heat wave, ending only on Sunday.

Or how heat waves this long have occurred just seven times in the city since 1896, according to data compiled by Consolidated Edison. (There have been longer ones, but we don’t want to upset you with the details.)

Or that the forecast high is 97.

Instead, we’re going to discuss cool. Where to find it. How to stay it.

And you’re going to help.

We were struck on Wednesday by the announcement that New Jersey Transit is keeping air-conditioned waiting rooms open late to offer some relief, and started wondering:

What’s your special place to keep cool?

Leave a comment below or send ideas to @nytmetro using #NYToday, and we’ll post the best ones here.

(Here’s ours: the “Rain Room” installation at the Museum of Modern Art. Or its humbler cousin, a fire hydrant with a sprinkler cap.)

Here’s what else you need to know to start this uncool Thursday.

TRANSIT & TRAFFIC

Roads O.K. so far, 1010 WINS reports.

Alternate-side parking rules: in effect.

Mass Transit Delays on B train southbound. Click for the latest status.

COMING UP TODAY

• On the mayoral campaign trail, Bill de Blasio and John A. Catsimatidis will appear at a Bronx youth fair at St. Mary’s Park Playground. Other candidates have cooler ideas: Anthony D. Weiner is going to the Annual Seaside Summer Concert Series in Brooklyn (believe it or not, it’s Lynyrd Skynyrd). Christine C. Quinn is going to the movies in Brooklyn.

• The city’s firefighters’ union plans to go to court to try to halt the use of the new 911 system. [DNAInfo]

• Nelson Mandela, ailing in South Africa, turns 95. Celebrate Nelson Mandela International Day with special events at the New York Public Library. [Free]

• At 10 a.m. the Services for the UnderServed Veterans Job Expo begins. Open to active duty military, veterans, retirees, reservists and their family members. Come with résumés to the Fashion Institute of Technology Conference Center in Chelsea.

• Go hear accordions in Bryant Park at the “Accordions Around the World” series this evening from 5 to 9. [Free]

• Have a “botanically inspired cocktail” at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx and listen to music amid foxgloves, poppies and lavender.

Make unusual mosaics out of reused material at the Materials for the Art warehouse on Northern Boulevard in Queens.

• Take in a concert of poetry at Lincoln Center’s David Rubenstein Atrium at 7:30 p.m. [Free]

• Clamber up an outdoor rock wall in Manhattan with a new guidebook (when it’s a little cooler, please!).

• For more events, see The New York Times’s Arts & Entertainment guide.

IN THE NEWS

• Voters say empathy is the most important trait for the next mayor, according to a poll by The New York Times and Siena College. Ms. Quinn is leading, with 27 percent, followed by Mr. Weiner, with 18 percent. [New York Times]

• Deadly heat. What may be the first heat-related death of summer occurs on Staten Island. [NBC New York]

• Countless New Yorkers were woken before 4 on Wednesday morning when their cellphones blared with an Amber Alert about a baby who had been abducted by his mother from a foster care agency in Harlem. He has been found in good condition. Why did the alert go off? We explain. [New York Times]

AND FINALLY…

Anyone lose a chicken? According to the message board of Just Food City Chicken Meet Up, an urban chicken enthusiasts’ group, one was found wandering around Prospect Park in Brooklyn near Windsor Terrace on Wednesday morning. The chicken is, according to a woman named Helen Dames, “very sweet.” Here is photographic evidence.

Ms. Dames, who rescued the bird, is trying to return it to its rightful farmer. Failing that, find an adoptive home.


Michaelle Bond and Andy Newman contributed reporting.

We’re testing New York Today, which we put together just before dawn and update until noon.

What information would you like to see here when you wake up to help you plan your day? Tell us in the comments, send suggestions to Sarah Maslin Nir or tweet them at @nytmetro using #NYToday. Thanks!

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300 Manhattan Climbing Routes, and Not One of Them Indoors

A long, thin crack runs up a craggy gray slab of rock outcrop overlooking the Hudson River in Fort Tryon Park. Few pay it much attention. Runners jog past. Dogs trot by, occasionally raising a leg. Couples cuddle on a bench nearby.

For Gareth Leah, however, this is a piece of his urban Yosemite, an opportunity for an outdoor pursuit resting in rare New York anonymity. Standing a few feet from the rock face, he contemplated it for a second, like a boxer sizing up his opponent, then sprang into action: his left big toe crammed into the crack, his index finger hooked around a small dimple. Then he pulled. Four moves later, he was standing atop the 12-foot-high boulder, dusting excess chalk off his hands.

“I was so amazed when I was talking to people and they’d say, ‘I’d love to go climbing but I don’t know where to go,’” Mr. Leah said as he scampered down one side of the rock face. After hearing that lament countless times, he said, “it kind of started some slight ideas in my mind.”

And so Mr. Leah has spent over a year examining jug holds, cracks, toe holds and slabs to write “NYC Bouldering,” a guidebook detailing over 300 bouldering routes that traverse rock faces throughout Manhattan. The book will be published in August by Sharp End Books.

The sport of bouldering, which involves short climbs, usually with no ropes or harnesses, is not new to New York, which is home to several world-class indoor venues. But the idea of climbing actual outdoor rocks, tucked away in parks and along highways amid towering skyscrapers, remains relatively obscure within the city’s climbing community, which is primarily centered on a few select boulders in Central Park.

Mr. Leah first encountered outdoor rock climbing in Manhattan at Rat Rock, a craggy, chalk-dusted outcrop shaped like a lumpy potato. The name of the spot, in the southwestern section of Central Park, derives from the many rats and crack vials that littered the top before climbers gradually made the spot their own.

“Back in the ’80s, there was only about 15 of us,” said William Piehl, a personal trainer who has been climbing around New York City for over 25 years. “Then other people started to come in and we got a name, and everyone would go right to Rat Rock. There was never really a guidebook for it. It was a lot of word-of-mouth to get to other spots.”

The city may be covered in asphalt, concrete and steel, but long before it was settled, Manhattan was a raw island of mostly glaciated schist rock. So, as Mr. Leah set about documenting Manhattan’s climbing rocks, he used a tool often found in the hands of climbers but rarely in other New Yorkers’: topographical maps.

“There are fault lines that run all the way through Manhattan,” Mr. Leah said. “I found that if you follow the fault line, you can find rock pretty much everywhere. So, I spent two months just walking up and down the fault line mapping where all the rock was in the city.”

His explorations yielded discoveries of rock faces as diverse as the city they sit in. Bouldering routes, often referred to as “problems” or “projects,” are graded on a scale of v.0 to v.15, depending on their degree of difficulty, with v.0 being the easiest. Mr. Leah, with help from his book’s photographer, François Lebeau, who is also a climber, and Mr. Piehl, found projects as easy as v.0 and as difficult as v.14. Other projects, including one on a tall, Easter Island-esque boulder on the south slope of Fort Tryon, have not even been successfully climbed.

As Mr. Leah finds new routes to climb from Chelsea to Inwood, indoor gyms around the city continue to multiply. Brooklyn Boulders, an enormous rock climbing gym in Gowanus, Brooklyn, is considering adding a location in Queens. In Long Island City, the Cliffs is scheduled to open this summer with over 30,000 square feet of climbing space, making it one of the largest climbing gyms in the country.

The gyms are also helping to send more climbers outside, according to Lorenzo Montañez, a Bronx native who has been climbing around New York for about a decade. He credits Mr. Leah for finding “so many new lines in rocks that I never gave much thought to,” and is hoping the guidebook will help augment the outdoor climbing scene.

“I can actually walk around with a crash pad and people would know exactly what it is that I’m carrying around,” Mr. Montañez said, referring to the three-inch-thick foam pads to cushion falls often carted around on a climber’s back like a turtle shell. “They’d say, ‘Oh, you’re going to go climbing, dude? Can I see, or come along? Because I climb, too.’”

Below is an excerpt from Mr. Leah’s guidebook, with 10 bouldering problems for Rat Rock. Click here to download.

NYC Bouldering Guide Excerpt – Rat Rock (PDF)

NYC Bouldering Guide Excerpt – Rat Rock (Text)

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When Rocks Call, a New Book Will Help Climbers Answer

A long, thin crack runs up a craggy gray slab of rock outcrop overlooking the Hudson River in Fort Tryon Park. Few pay it much attention. Runners jog past. Dogs trot by, occasionally raising a leg. Couples cuddle on a bench nearby.

For Gareth Leah, however, this is a piece of his urban Yosemite, an opportunity for an outdoor pursuit resting in rare New York anonymity. Standing a few feet from the rock face, he contemplated it for a second, like a boxer sizing up his opponent, then sprang into action: his left big toe crammed into the crack, his index finger hooked around a small dimple. Then he pulled. Four moves later, he was standing atop the 12-foot-high boulder, dusting excess chalk off his hands.

“I was so amazed when I was talking to people and they’d say, ‘I’d love to go climbing but I don’t know where to go,’” Mr. Leah said as he scampered down one side of the rock face. After hearing that lament countless times, he said, “it kind of started some slight ideas in my mind.”

And so Mr. Leah has spent over a year examining jug holds, cracks, toe holds and slabs to write “NYC Bouldering,” a guidebook detailing over 300 bouldering routes that traverse rock faces throughout Manhattan. The book will be published in August by Sharp End Books.

The sport of bouldering, which involves short climbs, usually with no ropes or harnesses, is not new to New York, which is home to several world-class indoor venues. But the idea of climbing actual outdoor rocks, tucked away in parks and along highways amid towering skyscrapers, remains relatively obscure within the city’s climbing community, which is primarily centered on a few select boulders in Central Park.

Mr. Leah first encountered outdoor rock climbing in Manhattan at Rat Rock, a craggy, chalk-dusted outcrop shaped like a lumpy potato. The name of the spot, in the southwestern section of Central Park, derives from the many rats and crack vials that littered the top before climbers gradually made the spot their own.

“Back in the ’80s, there was only about 15 of us,” said William Piehl, a personal trainer who has been climbing around New York City for over 25 years. “Then other people started to come in and we got a name, and everyone would go right to Rat Rock. There was never really a guidebook for it. It was a lot of word-of-mouth to get to other spots.”

The city may be covered in asphalt, concrete and steel, but long before it was settled, Manhattan was a raw island of mostly glaciated schist rock. So, as Mr. Leah set about documenting Manhattan’s climbing rocks, he used a tool often found in the hands of climbers but rarely in other New Yorkers’: topographical maps.

“There are fault lines that run all the way through Manhattan,” Mr. Leah said. “I found that if you follow the fault line, you can find rock pretty much everywhere. So, I spent two months just walking up and down the fault line mapping where all the rock was in the city.”

His explorations yielded discoveries of rock faces as diverse as the city they sit in. Bouldering routes, often referred to as “problems” or “projects,” are graded on a scale of v.0 to v.15, depending on their degree of difficulty, with v.0 being the easiest. Mr. Leah, with help from his book’s photographer, François Lebeau, who is also a climber, and Mr. Piehl, found projects as easy as v.0 and as difficult as v.14. Other projects, including one on a tall, Easter Island-esque boulder on the south slope of Fort Tryon, have not even been successfully climbed.

As Mr. Leah finds new routes to climb from Chelsea to Inwood, indoor gyms around the city continue to multiply. Brooklyn Boulders, an enormous rock climbing gym in Gowanus, Brooklyn, is considering adding a location in Queens. In Long Island City, the Cliffs is scheduled to open this summer with over 30,000 square feet of climbing space, making it one of the largest climbing gyms in the country.

The gyms are also helping to send more climbers outside, according to Lorenzo Montañez, a Bronx native who has been climbing around New York for about a decade. He credits Mr. Leah for finding “so many new lines in rocks that I never gave much thought to,” and is hoping the guidebook will help augment the outdoor climbing scene.

“I can actually walk around with a crash pad and people would know exactly what it is that I’m carrying around,” Mr. Montañez said, referring to the three-inch-thick foam pads to cushion falls often carted around on a climber’s back like a turtle shell. “They’d say, ‘Oh, you’re going to go climbing, dude? Can I see, or come along? Because I climb, too.’”

Below is an excerpt from Mr. Leah’s guidebook, with 10 bouldering problems for Rat Rock. Click here to download.

NYC Bouldering Guide Excerpt – Rat Rock (PDF)

NYC Bouldering Guide Excerpt – Rat Rock (Text)

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