#OccupyWallSt Roundup, Day 76

“Scared to death” by Occupy Wall Street, the Republican strategist Frank Luntz shared some strategies for discussing the protest movement at the Republican Governors Association convention Wednesday. Among his suggestions: don’t say capitalism (“I’m trying to get that word removed”), and when referring to proposed tax increases on the 1 percent, call it “taking from the rich,” rather than taxing. [Yahoo’s The Ticket]

A judge in Boston’s Suffolk Superior Court delayed a decision over whether the city has the right to evict protesters from their Dewey Square encampment, saying the tent city could remain in the meantime.

Jackson Browne and other acts played Thursday afternoon in Zuccotti Park.

In San Francisco, protesters prepared for a possible raid following a noon deadline to leave Justin Herman Plaza. A crowd in the park attacked a man who was said to be abusing his dog. [Bloomberg News, San Francisco Examiner]

Maybe the most wry and eloquent of all the Occupy Twitter feeds is Occupy MLA, a group of downtrodden academics planning to protest an array of complaints (“only the Oxford comma divides us!”) at the Modern Language Association’s January convention in Seattle. [Inside Higher Ed, Occupy MLA]

 

 

A Wall Street Journal columnist was shocked to find “a realistic, actionable idea” at Occupy protests in the Bay Area: the proposal to move $500 million of city funds out of banks like Wells Fargo and into a “municipal bank,” a credit union that does business with smaller, local banks. [Wall Street Journal]

Wednesday night, escorted by police and colliding with tourists, Occupy Wall Street protesters marched from Bryant Park to a Sheraton hotel in Midtown where President Obama was holding a fund-raiser. [City Room]

Again, journalists reported difficulty gaining access to unfolding events.

@MegRobertson Meg Robertson

NYPD asked me why I was being “so difficult” as they put foot against stupid French restaurant storm door and let me talk through 6″ crack.

Weds Nov 30 10:58:05 via Meg Robertson

The composer Philip Glass will make a statement at a General Assembly at Lincoln Center Thursday evening, where his opera, Satyagraha, on the life of Gandhi, is closing. Many Occupiers take their inspiration from the father of nonviolence, but others say Gandhi would not have approved of dividing the country into percentage groups. [Occupy Wall St, The New York Times]

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